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  • "A Suicide Foretold: How Social Justice Rhetoric is Turning People off Human Rights"

    by Agostini, Nicolas;
    Quillette;
    March 24th, 2022;

    Winning human rights battles depends on bringing ordinary people on board the human rights cause—and it starts with the language we use. As a human rights advocate and researcher, I’ve witnessed how recent rhetorical shifts are turning people off human rights. This is happening in three different ways and at three distinct levels: when we do advocacy with the general public, when we interact in the private sphere, and when we deliberate within the human rights movement itself.

    What are we talking about? New phraseologies. Established human rights language giving way to slogans. Neologisms. Hyperboles and metalepses. Instances of pure linguistic engineering. Social justice rhetoric, much of it coming from a critical theory perspective, is making its way into the human rights movement.

    Whether the critical social justice rhetoric of US activism takes over the human rights movement remains to be seen. The risk, however, is clear. If open debate is replaced with anathema, values with raw power relations, and rights with particularist claims, the human rights discourse will become irrelevant for most people.

    --- 1. Making human rights less clear: how we confuse people ---

    “The clearer your message, the better chance you have to convince your audience” says a basic rule of advocacy. Yet a look at contemporary human rights paints a disturbing picture. After 75 years of efforts, human rights folks are switching to a new, vaguer rhetoric.

    The performative assertions and programmatic rhetoric of critical social justice activism aren’t based on existing human rights law, clear state obligations, or reasonable expectations of what human rights can achieve in the short run. As a result, the human rights discourse is vaguer and vaguer. By setting goals human rights cannot meet and assigning ambitions they cannot match, critical social justice rhetoric ends up diluting human rights.

    --- 2. Making human rights less credible: how we irritate people ---

    Social justice rhetoric imports are producing another form of backlash. They don’t just look confusing. They irritate people.

    Rhetorical devices, and hyperboles and political correctness in general, put people on guard. When we eliminate nuance and abandon discernment, we erase the world’s complexities. We make human rights look simplistic. The more hyperbolic assertions get, the more righteous human rights folks feel, the less credible they are.

    The same process occurs when we make human rights less flexible than they should be. Critical social justice rhetoric imports are rigidifying human rights through compulsory capitalizations (one must write Black and Indigenous, but white). This is purely engineered language.

    Rhetorical shifts take human rights folks further and further away from common sense.

    --- 3. Making human rights less universal: how we tribalize people ---

    As the human rights discourse gets less clear and less credible, it also gets less universal. Rhetorical shifts reflect the tribalization of the human rights movement.

    Human rights language was designed for legal purposes and to avoid doing politics in the tribal sense of the word. If we replace it with critical social justice rhetoric, we reenter politics. Doing so, we provide ammunition to those seeking to delegitimize human rights activists as mere politicians… and we could end up giving an assist to the Right.

    This isn’t to say that human rights aren’t political. They are. This isn’t to say that human rights actors should always stay out of politics. This is illusory—human rights are about reining in those in power and confronting abuses. But we’re not talking about that kind of politics here. We’re talking about the kind of identity-based politics that makes activists lose battles before they have even started. We’re talking about human rights sounding particularist, not universal.

    As slogans turn into mantras and mantras turn into dogmas, they do little beyond preaching to the converted. As critical social justice activists get drunk on their new power, they feel authorized to deem dissenters outdated (at best) or monsters (at worst).

    https://bit.ly/3NqJTZf
    #humanRights #woke #wokeism #postModernism #criticalTheory
    "A Suicide Foretold: How Social Justice Rhetoric is Turning People off Human Rights" by Agostini, Nicolas; Quillette; March 24th, 2022; Winning human rights battles depends on bringing ordinary people on board the human rights cause—and it starts with the language we use. As a human rights advocate and researcher, I’ve witnessed how recent rhetorical shifts are turning people off human rights. This is happening in three different ways and at three distinct levels: when we do advocacy with the general public, when we interact in the private sphere, and when we deliberate within the human rights movement itself. What are we talking about? New phraseologies. Established human rights language giving way to slogans. Neologisms. Hyperboles and metalepses. Instances of pure linguistic engineering. Social justice rhetoric, much of it coming from a critical theory perspective, is making its way into the human rights movement. Whether the critical social justice rhetoric of US activism takes over the human rights movement remains to be seen. The risk, however, is clear. If open debate is replaced with anathema, values with raw power relations, and rights with particularist claims, the human rights discourse will become irrelevant for most people. --- 1. Making human rights less clear: how we confuse people --- “The clearer your message, the better chance you have to convince your audience” says a basic rule of advocacy. Yet a look at contemporary human rights paints a disturbing picture. After 75 years of efforts, human rights folks are switching to a new, vaguer rhetoric. The performative assertions and programmatic rhetoric of critical social justice activism aren’t based on existing human rights law, clear state obligations, or reasonable expectations of what human rights can achieve in the short run. As a result, the human rights discourse is vaguer and vaguer. By setting goals human rights cannot meet and assigning ambitions they cannot match, critical social justice rhetoric ends up diluting human rights. --- 2. Making human rights less credible: how we irritate people --- Social justice rhetoric imports are producing another form of backlash. They don’t just look confusing. They irritate people. Rhetorical devices, and hyperboles and political correctness in general, put people on guard. When we eliminate nuance and abandon discernment, we erase the world’s complexities. We make human rights look simplistic. The more hyperbolic assertions get, the more righteous human rights folks feel, the less credible they are. The same process occurs when we make human rights less flexible than they should be. Critical social justice rhetoric imports are rigidifying human rights through compulsory capitalizations (one must write Black and Indigenous, but white). This is purely engineered language. Rhetorical shifts take human rights folks further and further away from common sense. --- 3. Making human rights less universal: how we tribalize people --- As the human rights discourse gets less clear and less credible, it also gets less universal. Rhetorical shifts reflect the tribalization of the human rights movement. Human rights language was designed for legal purposes and to avoid doing politics in the tribal sense of the word. If we replace it with critical social justice rhetoric, we reenter politics. Doing so, we provide ammunition to those seeking to delegitimize human rights activists as mere politicians… and we could end up giving an assist to the Right. This isn’t to say that human rights aren’t political. They are. This isn’t to say that human rights actors should always stay out of politics. This is illusory—human rights are about reining in those in power and confronting abuses. But we’re not talking about that kind of politics here. We’re talking about the kind of identity-based politics that makes activists lose battles before they have even started. We’re talking about human rights sounding particularist, not universal. As slogans turn into mantras and mantras turn into dogmas, they do little beyond preaching to the converted. As critical social justice activists get drunk on their new power, they feel authorized to deem dissenters outdated (at best) or monsters (at worst). https://bit.ly/3NqJTZf #humanRights #woke #wokeism #postModernism #criticalTheory
    BIT.LY
    A Suicide Foretold: How Social Justice Rhetoric is Turning People off Human Rights
    Something strange is happening to the human rights discourse. Few people are paying attention, but like a cat whose hair bristles before the unknown, close observers have switched to alert mode. What are we talking about? New phraseologies. Established human rights language giving way to slogans. Neologisms. Hyperboles and metalepses.
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  • Newly reported cases of COVID-19 in Virginia’s children have dropped by a whopping 93% since Governor Glenn Youngkin ordered an end to school mask mandates upon taking office this January.

    A graph from the Virginia Department of Health charting newly reported COVID-19 cases in Virginians aged 0-19 was recently released showing the wild success of Republican Governor Glenn Youngkin’s executive order bringing an end to Virginia’s school mask mandates, which were enforced on children against the will of their parents.

    Immediately following the January 24th executive order to end school mask mandates in Virginia, the number of newly reported childhood COVID cases, which had reached as many as over 3,000 in one day, began a steady decline. By the end of February, cases had leveled out towards the bottom of the graph.

    [In addition to Governor Youngkin, Thank You Leon Benjamin, The America Project, and Patrick Byrne]

    https://bit.ly/3JVG0JG
    #medicalFreedom #virginia #youngkin #schools #publicEducation #parents #parentalRights #health #masks #rebreathing
    Newly reported cases of COVID-19 in Virginia’s children have dropped by a whopping 93% since Governor Glenn Youngkin ordered an end to school mask mandates upon taking office this January. A graph from the Virginia Department of Health charting newly reported COVID-19 cases in Virginians aged 0-19 was recently released showing the wild success of Republican Governor Glenn Youngkin’s executive order bringing an end to Virginia’s school mask mandates, which were enforced on children against the will of their parents. Immediately following the January 24th executive order to end school mask mandates in Virginia, the number of newly reported childhood COVID cases, which had reached as many as over 3,000 in one day, began a steady decline. By the end of February, cases had leveled out towards the bottom of the graph. [In addition to Governor Youngkin, Thank You Leon Benjamin, The America Project, and Patrick Byrne] https://bit.ly/3JVG0JG #medicalFreedom #virginia #youngkin #schools #publicEducation #parents #parentalRights #health #masks #rebreathing
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  • "Progressives build massive, cloaked online powerhouse"

    by Lachlan, Markay;
    Axios;
    March 27th, 2022;

    The network, operating under the name Real Voices Media, uses apolitical, nonideological content to build up audiences. It then leverages the crowd on behalf of clients in what experts say is a potent persuasion strategy.

    Example: Facebook and Instagram users in Michigan started seeing ads last month promoting stories by a new news site, the Main Street Sentinel. The aggregated content — from both news sources and the White House itself — touched on skyrocketing gas prices and broader price inflation, blaming corporate price gouging and Russia's invasion of Ukraine and mirroring lines from the Biden administration.

    It's not clear who's behind the site. Its listed publisher, Star Spangled Media LLC, was formed last month in New York and lists a registered agent service as its only officer.

    RVM oversees the digital properties under its umbrella. But their front-facing content is produced by creators recruited and trained to originally build social media followings focused on specific states and topics.

    During the 2020 cycle, influence among nonpolitical obsessives was used to serve voter registration and turnout ads in key swing states through a host of RVM pages.

    https://bit.ly/3iMDIAA
    #election2020 #election2022 #election2024
    "Progressives build massive, cloaked online powerhouse" by Lachlan, Markay; Axios; March 27th, 2022; The network, operating under the name Real Voices Media, uses apolitical, nonideological content to build up audiences. It then leverages the crowd on behalf of clients in what experts say is a potent persuasion strategy. Example: Facebook and Instagram users in Michigan started seeing ads last month promoting stories by a new news site, the Main Street Sentinel. The aggregated content — from both news sources and the White House itself — touched on skyrocketing gas prices and broader price inflation, blaming corporate price gouging and Russia's invasion of Ukraine and mirroring lines from the Biden administration. It's not clear who's behind the site. Its listed publisher, Star Spangled Media LLC, was formed last month in New York and lists a registered agent service as its only officer. RVM oversees the digital properties under its umbrella. But their front-facing content is produced by creators recruited and trained to originally build social media followings focused on specific states and topics. During the 2020 cycle, influence among nonpolitical obsessives was used to serve voter registration and turnout ads in key swing states through a host of RVM pages. https://bit.ly/3iMDIAA #election2020 #election2022 #election2024
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  • "Arizona Bill to Require Proof of Citizenship Before Voting is Now on Governor’s Desk"

    by Nino, Jose;
    Big League Politics;
    March 29th, 2022;

    Last week, the Arizona State Legislature passed legislation that would require citizens to provide proof of citizenship before voting in the state.

    House Bill 2492 would require Arizona voters to provide citizenship on voter registration documents.

    On March 23, 2022, the State Senate passed HB 2492 by a 16 to 12 vote.

    The Arizona State House has already passed this bill by a vote of 31 to 26. Under this bill, the county recorder or any other officer tasked with running elections must discard any application for voter registration that does not have sufficient proof of citizenship.

    https://bit.ly/3Dm7BBi
    #election2022 #election2024 #electionIntegrity #arizona #immigration #illegalImmigration
    "Arizona Bill to Require Proof of Citizenship Before Voting is Now on Governor’s Desk" by Nino, Jose; Big League Politics; March 29th, 2022; Last week, the Arizona State Legislature passed legislation that would require citizens to provide proof of citizenship before voting in the state. House Bill 2492 would require Arizona voters to provide citizenship on voter registration documents. On March 23, 2022, the State Senate passed HB 2492 by a 16 to 12 vote. The Arizona State House has already passed this bill by a vote of 31 to 26. Under this bill, the county recorder or any other officer tasked with running elections must discard any application for voter registration that does not have sufficient proof of citizenship. https://bit.ly/3Dm7BBi #election2022 #election2024 #electionIntegrity #arizona #immigration #illegalImmigration
    Arizona Bill to Require Proof of Citizenship Before Voting is Now on Governor’s Desk
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  • "Test scores prove remote learning has harmed K-12 education"

    by Moore, Art;
    WND;
    March 24th, 2022;

    Data from 7.3 million tests compiled by test provider Renaissance Learning Inc. showed student performance during the second year of the pandemic was worse than the first, with each state seeing marked declines in 2021

    The testing firm found that, on average, reading scores recorded during the 2021–2022 school year were nine points lower in the fall compared to the previous school year.

    In math, scores were eight points lower in the fall.

    If children don't have "those early literacy skills by the end of third grade, it does not bode well for their future."

    https://bit.ly/3uvsZ36
    #education #publicSchools #remoteLearning
    "Test scores prove remote learning has harmed K-12 education" by Moore, Art; WND; March 24th, 2022; Data from 7.3 million tests compiled by test provider Renaissance Learning Inc. showed student performance during the second year of the pandemic was worse than the first, with each state seeing marked declines in 2021 The testing firm found that, on average, reading scores recorded during the 2021–2022 school year were nine points lower in the fall compared to the previous school year. In math, scores were eight points lower in the fall. If children don't have "those early literacy skills by the end of third grade, it does not bode well for their future." https://bit.ly/3uvsZ36 #education #publicSchools #remoteLearning
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  • "Florida Poll: Controversial Parental Rights/LGBT Bill Has Majority Support...Among Democrats"

    by Benson, Guy;
    TownHall;
    March 25th, 2022;

    [The bill in question would bar] classroom instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity for five-to-eight-year-olds in grades K-3.

    A broader question asked by Politico/MC regarding the controversial legislation also found a national majority in favor, with just 35 percent opposed to Florida's legislation.

    Now we have the Florida-specific poll, mentioned above, that shows majority support among Democratic-leaning voters in the state for the general premise of banning sexual/gender instruction for young children in schools.

    The more Democrats make their messaging and governing decisions based on the often psychotic and unrepresentative tantrums of Very Online leftist activists, the more they'll keep getting sandbagged by normal voters.

    https://bit.ly/3Da4FaI
    #education #publicEducation #florida #desantis
    "Florida Poll: Controversial Parental Rights/LGBT Bill Has Majority Support...Among Democrats" by Benson, Guy; TownHall; March 25th, 2022; [The bill in question would bar] classroom instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity for five-to-eight-year-olds in grades K-3. A broader question asked by Politico/MC regarding the controversial legislation also found a national majority in favor, with just 35 percent opposed to Florida's legislation. Now we have the Florida-specific poll, mentioned above, that shows majority support among Democratic-leaning voters in the state for the general premise of banning sexual/gender instruction for young children in schools. The more Democrats make their messaging and governing decisions based on the often psychotic and unrepresentative tantrums of Very Online leftist activists, the more they'll keep getting sandbagged by normal voters. https://bit.ly/3Da4FaI #education #publicEducation #florida #desantis
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  • "Supreme Court rules against Navy SEALs, allows DOD to restrict deployment based on vax status"

    by Mittelstadt, Natalia;
    Just the News;
    March 25th, 2022;

    The Supreme Court on Friday blocked a lower court's ruling that prevented the Navy from making deployment decisions for Navy SEALs based on their COVID-19 vaccination status.

    The ruling clears the way for the Navy to keep SEALs from deployment if they aren't vaccinated. The SEALs had sued challenging the Navy's COVID-19 policies after being denied religious exemptions.

    Justice Brett Kavanaugh wrote in a concurring opinion that courts should not second-guess the Pentagon on issues of troop preparations.

    Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, and Neil Gorsuch all said they would have denied the Navy's request.

    "The Court does a great injustice to the 35 respondents—Navy Seals and others in the Naval Special Warfare community—who have volunteered to undertake demanding and hazardous duties to defend our country," Alito wrote in a dissent joined by Gorsuch. "These individuals appear to have been treated shabbily by the Navy, and the Court brushes all that aside."

    https://bit.ly/3DmZLrg
    #medicalFreedom #medicalTyranny #nationalSecurity #militaryReadiness #navy #navySeals #sealTeamSix #weakenedMilitary
    "Supreme Court rules against Navy SEALs, allows DOD to restrict deployment based on vax status" by Mittelstadt, Natalia; Just the News; March 25th, 2022; The Supreme Court on Friday blocked a lower court's ruling that prevented the Navy from making deployment decisions for Navy SEALs based on their COVID-19 vaccination status. The ruling clears the way for the Navy to keep SEALs from deployment if they aren't vaccinated. The SEALs had sued challenging the Navy's COVID-19 policies after being denied religious exemptions. Justice Brett Kavanaugh wrote in a concurring opinion that courts should not second-guess the Pentagon on issues of troop preparations. Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, and Neil Gorsuch all said they would have denied the Navy's request. "The Court does a great injustice to the 35 respondents—Navy Seals and others in the Naval Special Warfare community—who have volunteered to undertake demanding and hazardous duties to defend our country," Alito wrote in a dissent joined by Gorsuch. "These individuals appear to have been treated shabbily by the Navy, and the Court brushes all that aside." https://bit.ly/3DmZLrg #medicalFreedom #medicalTyranny #nationalSecurity #militaryReadiness #navy #navySeals #sealTeamSix #weakenedMilitary
    BIT.LY
    Supreme Court rules against Navy SEALs, allows DOD to restrict deployment based on vax status
    Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, and Neil Gorsuch said they would have denied the Navy's request.
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  • "Flight attendants sue over mask mandate on airplanes, transportation"

    by Howell, Tom;
    The Washington Times;
    March 28th, 2022;

    Nine flight attendants from six states said Monday they are suing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over the federal mask mandate on public transportation, arguing the COVID-19 rule obstructs their normal breathing over many hours and threatens aviation security because passengers refuse to comply.

    They want a judge to vacate the rule, which was recently extended to April 18, and prevent the CDC and the Department of Health and Human Services from issuing such a mandate again. The attendants filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado because one plaintiff, Victoria Vasenden of Southwest Airlines, is based at Denver International Airport.

    The lawsuit says being forced to police the rules among passengers in the skies is disrupting flights. They pointed to a recent letter from major airlines to the Biden administration that made a similar point. Also, a group of 10 pilots filed a similar lawsuit against the rule on March 10 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

    Airline workers say it doesn’t make sense to impose the rules on planes, where the air is constantly filtered

    The mask mandate on public transportation had been set to expire on March 18 but the Transportation Security Agency extended it a month on the advice of the CDC.

    https://bit.ly/3Dh7eYC
    #medicalFreedom #medicalTyranny #airlines #flights #travel
    "Flight attendants sue over mask mandate on airplanes, transportation" by Howell, Tom; The Washington Times; March 28th, 2022; Nine flight attendants from six states said Monday they are suing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over the federal mask mandate on public transportation, arguing the COVID-19 rule obstructs their normal breathing over many hours and threatens aviation security because passengers refuse to comply. They want a judge to vacate the rule, which was recently extended to April 18, and prevent the CDC and the Department of Health and Human Services from issuing such a mandate again. The attendants filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado because one plaintiff, Victoria Vasenden of Southwest Airlines, is based at Denver International Airport. The lawsuit says being forced to police the rules among passengers in the skies is disrupting flights. They pointed to a recent letter from major airlines to the Biden administration that made a similar point. Also, a group of 10 pilots filed a similar lawsuit against the rule on March 10 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. Airline workers say it doesn’t make sense to impose the rules on planes, where the air is constantly filtered The mask mandate on public transportation had been set to expire on March 18 but the Transportation Security Agency extended it a month on the advice of the CDC. https://bit.ly/3Dh7eYC #medicalFreedom #medicalTyranny #airlines #flights #travel
    BIT.LY
    Flight attendants sue over mask mandate on airplanes, transportation
    Nine flight attendants from six states said Monday they are suing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention over the federal mask mandate on public transportation, arguing the COVID-19 rule obstructs their normal breathing over many hours and threatens aviation security because passengers refuse to comply.
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  • "New Peer-Reviewed Research Finds Evidence of 2020 Voter Fraud"

    by Lott, John;
    Real Clear Politics;
    March 28th, 2022;

    By a margin of 52% to 40%, voters believe that “cheating affected the outcome of the 2020 U.S. presidential election.” That’s per a Rasmussen Reports survey from [March '22]. This stands in stark contrast to the countless news stories editorializing about “no evidence of voter fraud” and “the myth of voter fraud.”

    It isn’t just Republicans who believe this cheating occurred. Even 34% of Democrats believe it, as do 38% of those who “somewhat” support President Biden. A broad range of Americans think this: men, women, all age groups, whites, those who are neither white nor black, Republicans, those who are neither Republicans nor Democrats, all job categories, all income groups except those making over $200,000 per year, and all education groups except those who attended graduate school.

    New research of mine is forthcoming in the peer-reviewed economics journal Public Choice, and it finds evidence of around 255,000 excess votes (possibly as many as 368,000) for Joe Biden in six swing states where Donald Trump lodged accusations of fraud. Biden only carried these states – Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin – by a total of 313,253 votes. Excluding Michigan, the gap was 159,065.

    [If one reads the article, it would appear John R Lott Jr has not been informed on work being done by individuals like Jovan Hutton Pulitzer, Seth Keshel, @PitonforUnitedStatesSenate, and others. It also appears John Lott is not familiar with the direct video evidence, hundreds of direct witness affiants, documentary evidence, statistical evidence, ballot forensic evidence, or machine forensic evidence presented before 2021. Hopefully he networks with the right individuals before he reinvents the wheel.]

    https://bit.ly/3NtpMtj
    #electionIntegrity #election2020 #georgia #pennsylvania #wisconsin #michigan #arizona
    "New Peer-Reviewed Research Finds Evidence of 2020 Voter Fraud" by Lott, John; Real Clear Politics; March 28th, 2022; By a margin of 52% to 40%, voters believe that “cheating affected the outcome of the 2020 U.S. presidential election.” That’s per a Rasmussen Reports survey from [March '22]. This stands in stark contrast to the countless news stories editorializing about “no evidence of voter fraud” and “the myth of voter fraud.” It isn’t just Republicans who believe this cheating occurred. Even 34% of Democrats believe it, as do 38% of those who “somewhat” support President Biden. A broad range of Americans think this: men, women, all age groups, whites, those who are neither white nor black, Republicans, those who are neither Republicans nor Democrats, all job categories, all income groups except those making over $200,000 per year, and all education groups except those who attended graduate school. New research of mine is forthcoming in the peer-reviewed economics journal Public Choice, and it finds evidence of around 255,000 excess votes (possibly as many as 368,000) for Joe Biden in six swing states where Donald Trump lodged accusations of fraud. Biden only carried these states – Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin – by a total of 313,253 votes. Excluding Michigan, the gap was 159,065. [If one reads the article, it would appear John R Lott Jr has not been informed on work being done by individuals like Jovan Hutton Pulitzer, Seth Keshel, @PitonforUnitedStatesSenate, and others. It also appears John Lott is not familiar with the direct video evidence, hundreds of direct witness affiants, documentary evidence, statistical evidence, ballot forensic evidence, or machine forensic evidence presented before 2021. Hopefully he networks with the right individuals before he reinvents the wheel.] https://bit.ly/3NtpMtj #electionIntegrity #election2020 #georgia #pennsylvania #wisconsin #michigan #arizona
    BIT.LY
    New Peer-Reviewed Research Finds Evidence of 2020 Voter Fraud | RealClearPolitics
    By a margin of 52% to 40%, voters believe that “cheating affected the outcome of the 2020 U.S. presidential election.” That’s per a Rasmussen Reports...
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  • Three Milwaukee, Wisconsin, officials face accusations of illegally taking "Zuck Bucks" to facilitate voting by purchasing absentee ballot drop boxes, among other things, according to a lawsuit filed by the Thomas More Society.

    The complaint, filed last week against Milwaukee Acting Mayor Cavalier Johnson, former Mayor Tom Barrett, and City Clerk Jim Owczarski, claims the officials violated Wisconsin's election bribery law by taking private donations from the non-profit Center for Tech and Civic Life, which is funded by billionaire Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan.

    The Thomas More Society has filed five lawsuits in Wisconsin. The Milwaukee follows cases in Racine, Green Bay, Kenosha and Madison, all of which asserted that officials violated election law by accepting money from the Zuckerberg-funded election group.

    "We can’t undo the wrongs of the 2020 election," Kaardal said. “But it is incumbent upon us to ensure that the corruption that infected Wisconsin’s voting process is rooted out and that the state’s election integrity is preserved."

    It is illegal in Wisconsin for anyone to take money to encourage a voter to go to the poll, which is the main reason why the five towns were given money from the Zuckerberg-backed group, the Thomas More Society explained in the complaint.

    "The evidence in this complaint is overwhelming and condemning," Kaardal said. "Even on the surface, given all benefit of doubt, there is no question that Mayor Barrett, and Clerk Owczarski accepted private money from the Center for Tech and Civic Life to facilitate in-person and absentee voting in Milwaukee, as well as illegal ballot drop boxes. This is in violation of Wisconsin election law."

    In Wisconsin, the state's Supreme Court has ruled election regulators unlawfully allowed tens of thousands of absentee voters to skip voter ID checks by claiming they were "indefinitely confined" by the pandemic without suffering from a disability. Wisconsin's legislative audit bureau found numerous other rule changes were made that were not approved by the state legislature.

    https://bit.ly/3wKdirh
    #election2020 #election2022 #wisconsin #racineCounty #greenbay #kenosha
    Three Milwaukee, Wisconsin, officials face accusations of illegally taking "Zuck Bucks" to facilitate voting by purchasing absentee ballot drop boxes, among other things, according to a lawsuit filed by the Thomas More Society. The complaint, filed last week against Milwaukee Acting Mayor Cavalier Johnson, former Mayor Tom Barrett, and City Clerk Jim Owczarski, claims the officials violated Wisconsin's election bribery law by taking private donations from the non-profit Center for Tech and Civic Life, which is funded by billionaire Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan. The Thomas More Society has filed five lawsuits in Wisconsin. The Milwaukee follows cases in Racine, Green Bay, Kenosha and Madison, all of which asserted that officials violated election law by accepting money from the Zuckerberg-funded election group. "We can’t undo the wrongs of the 2020 election," Kaardal said. “But it is incumbent upon us to ensure that the corruption that infected Wisconsin’s voting process is rooted out and that the state’s election integrity is preserved." It is illegal in Wisconsin for anyone to take money to encourage a voter to go to the poll, which is the main reason why the five towns were given money from the Zuckerberg-backed group, the Thomas More Society explained in the complaint. "The evidence in this complaint is overwhelming and condemning," Kaardal said. "Even on the surface, given all benefit of doubt, there is no question that Mayor Barrett, and Clerk Owczarski accepted private money from the Center for Tech and Civic Life to facilitate in-person and absentee voting in Milwaukee, as well as illegal ballot drop boxes. This is in violation of Wisconsin election law." In Wisconsin, the state's Supreme Court has ruled election regulators unlawfully allowed tens of thousands of absentee voters to skip voter ID checks by claiming they were "indefinitely confined" by the pandemic without suffering from a disability. Wisconsin's legislative audit bureau found numerous other rule changes were made that were not approved by the state legislature. https://bit.ly/3wKdirh #election2020 #election2022 #wisconsin #racineCounty #greenbay #kenosha
    BIT.LY
    Milwaukee officials face Zuckerberg-related election bribery lawsuit
    "The evidence in this complaint is overwhelming and condemning," a Thomas More Society attorney said.
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