The five best books about working at home from home for remote workers


Remote work is amazing. It is possible to say goodbye to the lonely commute, uncomfortable business professional outfits, and high-priced takeout.


Relax in the morning with slippers, hoodies or slippers.


Remote work can be a challenge. Remote work can be difficult because you may be hundreds to many thousands of miles away. Additionally, you have a home workspace that lacks many of the features of an office. It can quickly make your work-life boundaries blurred.


These books are full of strategies and tips to help you conquer every obstacle, and others that you may not yet have found out about.


1. Working Remotely: Tips to Success for Workers on Distributed TeamsUnlike many remote work books aimed at entrepreneurs and leaders, Douglas, Gordon, and Webber concentrate on the front-line remote worker. The book is split into seven chapters, each focused on a specific key element of WFH success.


You'll learn how to battle loneliness and isolation and loneliness, as well as how to work with your peers, and manage your inbox. They provide concrete tips along with examples and anecdotes which will help you understand the points.


2. Tips for Working From Home 500+ ways to Stay Organized and Productive While Working From Home!
My laptop and keyboard were with me when I left HubSpot's Boston offices on March 20th. They were my only hope for the next couple of months, and I was certain I would use them up for a while.


After eight months, the majority of our team still works at the comfort of their homes. The same will be the case for a long time. It may be forever!


This book contains all of the valuable advice I wished for when I switched to permanent remote work. It discusses common scenarios like how to keep the boundaries between work and private life (when you have your office in your bedroom, kitchen or living room), and how to combat isolation and loneliness. You can also find advice for parents, managers, freelancers and other professionals.


When you're done, you'll know everything you need to be successful and happy as remote workers.

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3. The Holloway Guide to Remote Work
This guide will help leaders in navigating the most common issues related to remote work and solutions, including hiring, onboarding and remuneration for remote workers; establishing the communication channels and expectations and creating a positive company culture across all time zones.

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Buritica (Womersley) is based on their experience managing teams of distributed engineers at Splice/Buffer, and. Remote.com, Angel List, Doist, Remote.com and other remote organizations have also contributed. Each suggestion is therefore realistic and practical. It is often backed with examples, data or cases studies.

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4. A MOTE OFFICE IS Not required
This manifesto will help you comprehend the benefits of remote work. Fried and Hansson spend most of REMOTE: Office Not Required refuting the arguments against allowing folks to work from wherever they'd like, such as:

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There is no need for an office to collaborate.
The size of your company and the industry don't matter.
Your pool of potential employees is not going to shrink, it will grow
Already believe in remote work? Looking for some practical advice on how to do remote work well? Consider the Holloway Guide and Work-From-Home Hacks.

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5. Subtle Acts and Exclusion: How do you understand, identify, and stop microaggressions
Microaggressions (or Subtle Acts of Exclusion as Jana and Baran call it) can occur anyplace, regardless of whether you're remote or co-located.

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SAEs can be more difficult to deal with when you're not in same room.


What if you were the one to carry out the SAE? Without the advantages of sharing an Office, it's much harder to repair the damage caused by the relationship.

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That is what makes Jana and Baran's book a must book for teams with distributed members. How to prevent, detect, and deal with SAEs. This will ensure everyone feels included and safe.